Who are the New York Yankees TV Announcers?

The New York Yankees have a long and storied history, and their television announcers are a big part of that. Who are the men (and woman) who have had the honor of calling Yankees games on TV?

Checkout this video:

httpv://youtu.be/https://www.youtube.com/shorts/nLcq1fT7EGo

Michael Kay

The New York Yankees have been around for a long time and have been one of the most successful teams in baseball history. They have had many great players and announcers over the years. The current TV announcers for the Yankees are Michael Kay and Ken Singleton.

Biography

Michael Kay (born February 2, 1961) is an American sportscaster. He is the television play-by-play announcer for the New York Yankees on the YES Network and WPIX, and host of CenterStage on YES. He also has his own radio talk show on WEPN in New York City called “The Michael Kay Show”, which airs weekdays from 3-7 p.m.

Kay was born in Manhattan, to fellow sportscasters Bob and Bert Kay. He grew up in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York and graduated from Hackley School in Tarrytown before going on to study at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1983.

Kay began his broadcasting career as a stringer for WWOR TV (now My9) while still in college. After graduation, he worked as a news clerk for ABC News followed by a short stint as weekend sports anchor at WKBW TV in Buffalo, New York. He then spent two years as sports director at WTEN TV in Albany before returning to New York City as weekend sports anchor at WABC TV in 1988. From there, he became sports anchor at WPIX (where he would later become the Yankees’ play-by-play announcer), and also began working as a fill-in sports anchor at WABC Radio.

In 1992, Kay began his career with the Yankees as a pregame host and occasional radio analyst. In 1997, he was promoted to television play-by-play announcer, replacing Mel Proctor. In 2009, Kay was named theYES Network’s Director of Play-by-Play announcers & Talent Development; he also continues to serve as lead play-by-play voice for the network’s live game broadcasts of the Yankees each season

broadcasting career

Michael Kay began his broadcasting career as the play-by-play voice of the AA Binghamton Mets from 1983 to 1987. He was hired by the Yankees in 1989 to be their Triple-AColumbus Clippers announcer. He called select regular season games on SportsChannel New York from 1991 to 1993. When WPIX became the Yankees’ home in 1998, Kay became the primary television voice of the team, a position he has held ever since.

Ken Singleton

Ken Singleton is a former Major League Baseball player who is now a television broadcaster for the New York Yankees. He played for the Montreal Expos, Baltimore Orioles, and New York Yankees.

Biography

Ken Singleton is an American former professional baseball player and television sportscaster. He played as an outfielder and designated hitter in Major League Baseball for the Montreal Expos, Baltimore Orioles, and New York Yankees from 1970 to 1984. Singleton was a three-time All-Star and won the 1980 American League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award.

After his playing career, Singleton became a television broadcaster forSportsNet New York and the YES Network. He also works as an occasional commentator for national baseball broadcasts on Fox and MLB Network.

broadcasting career

Ken Singleton was born in New York City and grew up in Yonkers, New York. He played baseball and basketball at Archibald J. Carey Jr. High School in Yonkers. In baseball, as a catcher, he was named to the All-Star team of the Bronx-Westchester League in 1965. He attended Fordham University, where he played college baseball for the Fordham Rams from 1968 through 1970. As a senior, he was batting .400 with eight home runs when he suffered a season-ending injury. Singleton was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles with the fifth pick of the first round of the 1970 Major League Baseball Draft.

Singleton made his Major League debut as a September call-up with the Orioles in 1971, and became a full-time starter in 1972 at age 22. That year, he batted .286 with 21 home runs and drove in 66 runs, which made him runner-up for AL Rookie of the Year behind Billy Conigliaro of the Boston Red Sox. In 1973, he batted .288 with 27 home runs and 103 RBIs and was again runner-up for AL Rookie of the Year, this time behind Cecil Cooper of the Milwaukee Brewers. In 1974, he batted .278 with 25 home runs and 86 RBIs.

David Cone

David Cone is a former pitcher who now serves as a color commentator and studio analyst for the New York Yankees on the YES Network. He also occasionally appears on the MLB Network as a studio analyst. Cone grew up in Kansas City, Missouri, and attended the University of Missouri, where he played college baseball.

Biography

David Edward Cone (born January 2, 1963), nicknamed “Coney”, is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher, and current color commentator for the New York Yankees on the YES Network. A five-time World Series champion, he pitched 12 shutouts in 1994, leading the league in that category. He was fifth in voting for the 1994 Cy Young Award. He ranks fifth all time among pitchers with at least 250 wins and 2500 strikeouts. With a strikeouts-to-walks ratio of 4.45, he is ranked second all time, behind only Sandy Koufax.

broadcasting career

David Cone began his broadcasting career in 2006 as a color commentator for the YES Network, alongside Michael Kay. He called games for the network until 2010, when he left to pursue other opportunities.

In 2011, Cone joined the MLB Network as a studio analyst. He appeared on various shows, including “MLB Tonight” and “Hot Stove.” He also called games for the network during the 2011 and 2012 seasons.

In 2013, Cone returned to the YES Network as a game analyst. He has been with the network ever since, calling games alongside Michael Kay and Ken Singleton.

Paul O’Neill

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball team that play in the American League East Division. Their home games are played at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, New York City. The team is owned by Yankee Global Enterprises, which also owns the YES Network, the team’s television home.

Biography

Paul O’Neill is an American sportscaster and former professional baseball right fielder who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He currently serves as a broadcaster for the New York Yankees.

O’Neill was born in Columbus, Ohio, and attended Brookhaven High School. He played college baseball at Ohio State University. Drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the fourth round of the 1981 MLB draft, he made his MLB debut in September 1985 and became a regular player for Cincinnati by 1987. In his rookie season, he helped lead the Reds to victory in the World Series. O’Neill won five World Series during his time with the Yankees.

He is a two-time All-Star (in 1991 and 1994) and won five Silver Slugger Awards as well as four Gold Glove Awards. Lauded for his work ethic and clutch hitting late in games, he compiled more than 2,700 hits during his career along with 281 home runs, 1,269 runs batted in (RBIs) and a .288 batting average. His .313 batting average with runners in scoring position (RISP) is one of the best of all-time among major leaguers.

O’Neill announced his retirement from baseball on December 10, 2001 after signing a one-day contract to retire as a Yankee player; this enabled him to retire wearing Yankee pinstripes rather than those of any other team. He has been working as a broadcaster for YES Network since 2002 serving as both lead analyst on some television broadcasts and color commentator/play-by-play announcer on radio broadcasts.

broadcasting career

Paul O’Neill began his broadcasting career in 1989 as the radio voice of the Columbus Clippers, the Triple-A affiliate of the New York Yankees. In 2001, he was hired by the YES Network to be an analyst and color commentator for Yankees games. He has held that position ever since, working alongside play-by-play announcers Michael Kay and Ken Singleton.

Jim Kaat

Jim Kaat is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who has been a television color commentator for the New York Yankees since 2009. He also worked as a color commentator for the Minnesota Twins from 1995 to 2002.

Biography

Jim Kaat is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the New York Yankees, Minnesota Twins, Chicago White Sox, Philadelphia Phillies, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was born in Zeeland, Michigan, on November 7, 1938. Kaat pitched for 25 years in the majors, winning 283 games and four Gold Glove Awards. He was a three-time All-Star and was awarded the Cy Young Award in 1966. After his playing career ended, Kaat became a television broadcaster for the Yankees and Twins. He has also written two books about his baseball career.

broadcasting career

Jim Kaat, nicknamed “Kitty”, is an American former baseball pitcher, writer and television broadcaster. He played for 25 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Washington Senators / Minnesota Twins (1959–1973), Chicago White Sox (1973–1975), Philadelphia Phillies (1976–1979), New York Yankees (1979–1980), and St. Louis Cardinals (1981). Kaat was a 3-time All-Star for his pitching and a Gold Glove Award winner for his defense. His career achievements include 16 consecutive seasons of 10 or more wins, 8 Gold Glove Awards, and a 1984 World Series Championship with the Detroit Tigers.

After his playing career ended, Kaat became a broadcaster for various MLB networks. In 2002, he wrote a book entitled Still Pitching: Wit, Wisdom and High Fastballs from the Greatest Mouth In Baseball. Currently, he is an analyst on Yankees on YES alongside Michael Kay and Ken Singleton[1].

Scroll to Top