Who Wore Number 16 for the Yankees?

A list of every player who has worn number 16 for the New York Yankees.

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Lou Gehrig

Though Babe Ruth is considered by many baseball fans to be the best Yankee ever, the true best Yankee is Lou Gehrig. Gehrig played his entire career with the Yankees, from 1923 to 1939. A first baseman, Gehrig was nicknamed “the Iron Horse” for his durability, appearing in 2,130 consecutive games.

Overview

Lou Gehrig was a professional baseball player who played for the New York Yankees from 1923-1939. He was nicknamed “The Iron Horse” for his durability, playing in 2,130 consecutive games. Lou Gehrig was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939, and his number, 16, was retired by the Yankees.

Early life

Lou Gehrig was born in New York City on June 19, 1903. He was the first of four children born to Christina and Heinrich Gehrig. His parents had emigrated from Germany several years earlier. Gehrig’s father worked as a peg maker at a local cigar factory. Young Lou grew up in a tenement house on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. As a youngster, he delivered newspapers and shined shoes to help his family make ends meet.

Gehrig first played organized baseball when he was eight years old. He quickly showed himself to be a talented player. When he was 10, he joined a local youth team sponsored by the New York Giants baseball club. Three years later, he enrolled at Commerce High School, where he played baseball and football.

Playing career

Gehrig first played professionally for the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League in 1923. He batted .344 with 20 home runs, 96 RBI and 12 stolen bases that year. The New York Yankees purchased his contract from Hartford for $1,500 on September 19, 1923. He made his Major League debut against the Boston Red Sox on June 15, 1925; he played in 23 games that season and batted .273 with one home run and six RBIs.

During Spring training in 1926, Gehrig competed to be the starting first baseman with veteran Wally Pipp. Pipp was batting just .143 when he took himself out of the lineup on April 30. Gehrig replaced him and became the Yankees’ regular first baseman for what would turn out to be the next 2,130 consecutive games (a record that still stands).

Whitey Ford

Whitey Ford, born Edward Charles Ford on October 21, 1928, is a former professional baseball player who pitched for the New York Yankees for 16 seasons. He is a 10-time World Series champion and 6-time All-Star. Ford is the Yankees’ all-time leader in wins (236), shutouts (45), and winning percentage (.690).

Overview

Whitey Ford was an American professional baseball player. He played his entire Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the New York Yankees as a pitcher, spanning 18 seasons (1950–1967). Nicknamed “The Chairman of the Board”, he is MLB’s all-time leader in wins by a pitcher (236) and is second on the Yankees’ all-time list behind only Hall of Famer Yankee pitcher Red Ruffing. Ford is also recognized as one of the pitchers who helped usher in the “live-ball era” of baseball, characterized by increased offensive numbers.

Early life

EdWARD Charles “Whitey” Ford, nicknamed “The Chairman of the Board”, is an American former professional baseball pitcher who spent his entire 16-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the New York Yankees. He was voted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.

Playing career

Whitey Ford played his entire professional baseball career with the New York Yankees, from 1950 to 1967. He was a ten-time All-Star and six-time World Series champion. He still holds numerous Yankee records, including most career wins (236), most career shutouts (36), and most career innings pitched (3,170).

Roger Maris

Roger Maris was an American professional baseball right fielder who played on four Major League Baseball (MLB) teams from 1957 through 1968. Maris is best known for setting the Major League Baseball home run record while playing for the New York Yankees in 1961. The record was previously held by Babe Ruth.

Overview

Roger Maris played outfield for the New York Yankees from 1957-1966. He is most famous for hitting 61 home runs in 1961, which was a record at the time (since broken by Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa). He was a 6-time All-Star and won 2 World Series titles with the Yankees.

Early life

Roger Maris was born on September 10, 1934, in Hibbing, Minnesota, the son of Rudolph S. “Rudy” Maras (1908–1985) and Louisa Mary “Lucy” Garver (1912–1999). He was of Croatian descent through his father who, like many others in Hibbing’s large Croatian community, changed his surname from “Maras” to “Maris”.

His paternal grandparents, Matthe Maras (1876–1966) and Barbara Doll (1879–1966), emigrated from Austria-Hungary in 1905. His maternal grandparents, Jakov and Marija Garver (née Umek; 1885–1972), also emigrated from Austria-Hungary—Matthe and Jakov were born in the village of Vidovići in Croatia’s Lika region; Barbara and Marija were born in Slovenia.

In 1923 when Rudy was just nine years old, his father died of influenza leaving the family with little money. After Maris’ senior year at Hibbing High School, his mother suggested he finish school and find a job instead of attending college so he could help support the family.

Later that year, Maris’ older brother Bob graduated from broadcast engineering school and went to work for NBC Radio affiliate KDKA-AM in Pittsburgh. On October 31, 1947, Bob helped set up a 500-watt transmitter for WTOB-AM—a new radio station owned by the Tri-State Radio Company which also owned WTOB-FM. When asked what job he would like at WTOB after it went on the air that December 1st as “The Voice Of Tampa Bay”, Bob requested an announcer/disc jockey position which was given to him. A few weeks later Bob asked Rudy to join him in Tampa as an announcer/engineering staffer which Rudy did during the summer of 1948 while still attending Hibbing High School where he graduated from that June.

Playing career

Roger Maris was an American professional baseball right fielder who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams, from 1957 through 1968. Maris is best known for setting the Major League Baseball single-season home run record with 61 home runs in 1961, a mark that remained unbroken until 1998 by Mark McGwire. Roger Maris was an American professional baseball right fielder who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams, from 1957 through 1968. Maris is best known for setting the Major League Baseball single-season home run record with 61 home runs in 1961, a mark that remained unbroken until 1998 by Mark McGwire.

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